Donald Trump photographed looking at solar eclipse without glasses – Chron.com
U.S. President Donald Trump looks up toward the Solar Eclipse on the Truman Balcony at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump looks up a the partial solar eclipse with First Lady Melania Trump from the balcony of the White House in Washington, DC, on August 21, 2017. The Great American Eclipse completed its journey across the United States Monday, with the path of totality stretching coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century.


U.S.President Donald Trump puts on special glasses to look at the Solar Eclipse on the Truman Balcony at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
The total solar eclipse as seen from Salem, Oregon on August 21, 2017.
The moon covers the sun during a total solar eclipse as seen from Salem, Oregon on August 21, 2017.
In this NASA handout, the International Space Station (bottom right), with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, August 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming.
A partial eclipse is seen from South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
A partial solar eclipse appears over the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island in New York, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron Trump wear special glasses to view the solar eclipse from the Truman Balcony at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
White House staff and members of the White House press corps use glasses to look at the eclipse at the White House in Washington, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Vice President Mike Pence, with students from Cornerstone Schools, watches the solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
A total solar eclipse is seen above the Bald Knob Cross of Peace Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Alto Pass, Ill. More than 700 people visited the over 100 foot cross for the event. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
Luciane Queiroz uses an x-ray in hopes of viewing the partial eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
Members of the Rome Braves watch the eclipse at Spirit Communications Park during a break in minor league baseball August 21, 2017 in Columbia, South Carolina. The astrological occurrence marks the first transcontinental total solar eclipse in 99 years. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
Jasmine Shepherd, at window, and her brother Joshua, take photos from their seats on a special eclipse chaser flight before the flight intercepted a total solar eclipse, on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, over the Pacific Ocean. Passengers witnessed totality from over the ocean. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)
A person jumps off the top of the Stratosphere hotel and casino tower on the SkyJump ride during a partial solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
In this multiple exposure photograph, the phases of a partial solar eclipse are seen over the Gateway Arch on Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in St. Louis. The Gateway Arch was just a few miles outside of the path of totality. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
People watch a near total solar eclipse from a the top of a parking garage, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)
Brothers Chris and Gabe Fabiano watch the first solar eclipse to sweep across the United States in over 99 years on the beach August 21, 2017 on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
People watch a partial solar eclipse from the roof deck at the 1 Hotel Brooklyn Bridge on August 21, 2017 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. While New York City isn't in the path of today's total solar eclipse, thousands of residents and tourists alike participated in the excitement by using special glasses to view the unique occurrence when nearly 72 percent of the sun is covered by the moon during a partial solar eclipse. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
In this Aug. 20, 2017 photo, traffic flows toward the entrance to Carhenge north of Alliance, Neb., ahead of the eclipse.
Tyler Hanson, of Fort Rucker, Ala., watches the sun moments before the total eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
The sun peeks through the clouds as people wearing solar glasses watch the eclipse in Falls City, Neb., Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
Beth, who said she drove through the night from Arlington, Va., with her children for the total solar eclipse, naps outside of their tent at Spring City Elementary early Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, in Spring City, Tenn.
Katie Vega and her dog Toby wait for the solar eclipse in Weiser, Idaho, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. Katie and her husband Vincent traveled from Sacramento.
Like millions of other Americans, President Donald Trump stepped outside to view the Great American Eclipse on Monday.
Despite safety warnings, curiosity got the best of Trump and he was spotted admiring the total eclipse without solar filter glasses.
The president, First Lady Melania Trump and their youngest son Barron Trump checked out the cosmic phenomena at around 2:40 p.m., the moment the solar eclipse peaked over Washington D.C. and partially obscured the Sun. 
More on the Great American Eclipse
At 1600 Pennsylvania Ave, Trump and his family saw the Sun obscured by around 80 percent — a better view than Texans got, but not enough to remove their safety glasses.
NASA warned that the only safe time to view the eclipse without filtered glasses is during the brief total phase, or "totality." 
Viewing the sun can burn the eye's retina and cause permanent vision impairment and possibly legal blindness. 
See above for the best photos of eclipse watchers so far, including Trump.
Fernando Ramirez is a reporter for Chron.com and the Houston Chronicle. Fernando.ramirez@chron.com

source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *